First of all, be sure to read Chapter 9 (Story Forms) and Chapter 2 (The Basic News Story), if you haven’t already read it, before Tuesday’s class.

Hopefully, you took something from today’s class about what makes a story newsworthy. Below are the examples I shared in class. Don’t feel like you need to read all of these articles, but you definitely need to be reading news articles on a regular basis. Remember that more than one news value can apply to one article.

Reading other journalists’ work will improve your writing, knowledge of AP style and may spark story ideas. (You cannot copy someone’s story, but it may spark a new idea for you.) Also, as a future journalist or PR professional, you should have an interest in news itself.

NEWS VALUE: IMPACT

Should Md. put moratorium on poultry houses?

Drowning victim Brelle Ware, 7, remembered for smile

NEWS VALUE: TIMELINESS

MSP retiree named as choice for Pocomoke’s new chief

City ready for ‘whatever the outcome’ of Thursday’s motions hearing, mayor says

NEWS VALUE: PROXIMITY

SU fraternity raises money for charity in local concert

SU’s Hesselbirg wins CAC cross country athlete of week

Fired Wicomico employee sues county

NEWS VALUE: PROMINENCE

Prosecutors: Maureen McDonnell was a ‘full player’ in corruption case

Obama to visit Fort Meade on Friday

NEWS VALUE: ODDITY

Pile of whale puke will auction for upwards of $10,000

Stuck in elevator, thief calls 911, Laurel police say

@AP_Oddities Twitter

NEWS VALUE: CONFLICT

Mayor, city police union president clash over settlement

Pocomoke mayor resignation petition withdrawn

NEWS VALUE: HUMAN INTEREST

Survivor fundraises for breast cancer research with multi-state run

Salisbury’s Morgan Phillips has Olympic berth in sights

NEWS VALUE: HELPFULNESS

What parts of a marathon plan can you skimp on?

What’s the difference between electrolyte sources?

Happy reading! I cannot stress how important it is to read news articles of some kind.

See you Tuesday for a class on hard news writing.

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